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Creating Accessible Learning: Home

Accessibile Learning: A Definition

The WHAT

A person with a disability should have the opportunity to:

  • Acquire the same information
  • Engage in the same interactions
  • Enjoy the same services

...as a person without a disability.

The HOW

This should happen:

  • In an equally effective manner
  • In an equally integrated manner
  • With substantially equivalent ease of use.

Paraphrased from the Office for Civil Rights (2014).

Our Responsibility

Building accessible learning is something that benefits every single student. But firstly and most importantly, accessible learning creates an equitable educational experience for those who require accommodations or the use of accessibility tools.

As creators, enablers, and practitioners of education, each of us is responsible for ensuring an accessible, equivalent, and effective experience for all Library patrons.

Accessibility is something that should be built into the very foundations of everything we create. This requires us to be knowledgeable about the principles of accessibility, and to think about accessibility while still in the planning stages of building learning experiences.

The goal of this guide is to assist and enable all of us to create accessible learning experiences.

Guidelines

Organization of WCAG shown in a chart. Accessible PDF version available.

Understanding WCAG 2.1

Organization

WCAG 2.1 is organized by four foundational principles of web accessibility, which are further broken down into 13 guidelines. The guidelines provide the basic goals authors should work toward in order to make content more accessible to users with different disabilities. Testable success criteria are provided for each guideline

In order to meet the needs of different groups and different situations, success criteria are broken down into three levels of conformance: A (lowest; required), AA (required), and AAA (highest).

Meeting the Guidelines

For conformance with each guideline, you should meet both Levels A and AA at a minimum.

Each guideline outlines success criteria and includes further information for both understanding the guidelines, as well as WCAG techniques that provide guidance for web content authors and evaluators on meeting success criteria.

Use the How to Meet WCAG (Quick Reference) to find all of the above referenced materials in one location.